Cultivating Pharmacy Practice, Driving Research & Scholarship and Advancing Education

The Department of Pharmaceutical Care & Health Systems (PCHS) advances the practice of pharmaceutical care and its role in the healthcare system for the benefit of patients & society through education, research, & service.

PCHS is dedicated to the advancement of pharmaceutical care. Pharmaceutical care was originally conceptualized by faculty within our department and continues to be an integral focus to our departmental identity. pharmacy practiceOur faculty engage in a diverse array of pharmacy practice models and services in partnership with healthcare systems, health disciplines, and the community at large to provide high-quality patient-centered care. Our faculty meet this need through patient care, practice-based research, practice innovation, and education.  Learn more about our practice faculty

Faculty and trainees within our department study the pharmacy profession, patient care behaviors, government policies, and the economic, clinical, and humanistic aspects of medications.  dataLearn more about our research and scholarship in:

  • Patient Care
  • Pharmaceuticals and Public Policy
  • Educational Research

PCHS embraces a leadership role in curricular innovation at the College. Our faculty are serving in leadership roles that are creating new learning experiences for Doctor of Pharmacy students and modeling innovative teaching and learning strategies in a variety of courses.  Learn more about our advanacing education in:

  • EducationCurricular Domains
  • PharmD Emphasis - Leadership
  • Advancement of Experiential Education
  • Innovations in Teaching

graduate schoolStudy the social, psychosocial, political, legal, historic, and economic factors that impinge upon the use, non-use and abuse of drugs.  Learn more about SAPh Degree Programs

Faculty Spotlight:
Kylee Funk

kylee funk in clinicPart of interprofessional partnership to improve medical access for growing, diverse downtown community.

Faculty Spotlight:
Oscar Garza

Oscar GarzaAddressing critical health inequities using a framework of social justice and University-Community partnerships.

PCHS in the News

Steve Schondelmeyer is featured in the CBS News story, "Prescription drug prices can vary by thousands of dollars depending on where you buy them."  He was also featured in the Star Tribune stories "Minnesota employers target high medication prices with 'playbook" and "Minnesota patients paying the price of drug roulette."

Amy Pittenger is quoted in the Minnesota Daily story, "UMN looks to revamp longstanding lib ed requirements."

Greg Rhee was quoted in several news outlets regarding his research that found doctors are increasing simultaneous prescriptions of benzodiazepines and opioids: MPRMesabi Daily News, and Association of Health Care Journalists.

Kristin Janke, Social and Administrative Pharmacy graduate student Lisa Hillman, and alumnus Kathryn Smith were quoted in the December Academic Pharmacy Now article, “Together, We Write,” which celebrated the #RxWritingChallenge.

Wendy St. Peter is quoted in the Minnesota Daily story, "Long-awaited academic health restructure goes into effect."

Ann Philbrick is quoted in the Duluth News Tribune story, "Shortage of shingles vaccine expected to continue through 2019, St. Luke’s pharmacist says."

PCHS News

Rui Zhang

The three-year award is given to the most promising faculty who have been newly granted both tenure and promotion to associate professor.

Jon Schommer

Jon C. Schommer, MS, PhD, RPH, associate department head and professor, Pharmaceutical Care & Health Systems, will receive the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) Research Achievement Award in the Pharmaceutical Sciences. The award recognizes and encourages outstanding, meritorious achievement in any of the pharmaceutical sciences.

opioids

Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and Halcion, are prescribed sedatives to help with anxiety, insomnia and other conditions. Both benzodiazepines and opioids are considered potentially harmful and addictive drugs in older adults because they increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in older adults.

Pages